Nutrition - Fitness > Hospital

Hospital protocol improves care for children with sickle cell disease

One year ago   |   By Healio

Vaso-occlusive episode-specific interventions employed by the Boston Medical Center resulted in more than a 50% reduction in ED wait time and an improvement in care for pediatric patients with sickle cell disease, according to results of a quality improvement initiative. Vaso-occlusive episode (VOE) — one of the most common complications for patients with sickle cell disease — causes extreme and debilitating pain. Previous studies have suggested patients who experienced VOE may wait 65 to 90 minutes in the ED before received their first dose of parenteral analgesia.
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Early ART initiation a step forward on path to 'AIDS-free generation'

One year ago   |   By Healio

Carlos Malvestutto, MD, MPH, assistant professor in the division of infectious diseases at The Ohio State University and medical director of the Family AIDS Clinic and Education Services at Nationwide Children's Hospital, discusses the implications of recent findings on antiretroviral therapy initiation.Although U.S. guidelines endorsing ART for patients with HIV and CD4 counts below 350 were backed by scientific data, Malvestutto explains the recommendation for ART in all infected patents regardless of CD4 count was based on observation and opinion until the "irrefutable evidence" from...
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5 Times I Didn't Want to Stay Sober. But Why I Did Anyway

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

The majority of what I write has to do with the blessings that sobriety has brought to me, and most of the time that is truly how I feel about being sober. However, I wouldn't be an alcoholic if I didn't occasionally wish I could just throw caution to the wind and drink like everyone around me does. While not often, this does still happen to me. I still get that ache for a night of the unknown, a night where anything could happen if only I could drink. Over my 2.5 years of sobriety, I've found that this ache comes during the extreme highs and lows in my life, which makes sense. Of course...
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An aggressive treatment for an aggressive cancer

One year ago   |   By ScienceDaily

Pancreas cancer remains one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In the United States, it accounts for only three percent of all diagnosed cancers but it causes almost seven percent of all cancer deaths. A pancreas cancer diagnosis often comes after age 50 and after the cancer has spread, making it difficult to remove surgically. A new clinical trial may help more people to undergo surgery to remove their pancreas tumors. And that may help more of them to live longer.
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Terrifying Viral Photos Prompt Important Conversation About Car Seat Safety

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

A viral Facebook post from a Florida fire department used car accident photos to share a very important message with families.
On Monday, the Wakulla County Fire Rescue shared some dramatic images from a three-vehicle crash that affected a mother and her two toddlers. The photo album was titled "Car Seats SAVE two children!"
"A one year old and three year old escaped serious injury and possibly worse because their mother took the time to assure they were secured in their approved child seats,"
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Date Night, a Family Pic and a HUGE Announcement!

One year ago   |   By Yum Yucky

I came across this old pic of me on a date with the hubby...
We needed to buy a machete before going to dinner, yet I was curiously drawn to the pick axe. I hated those jeans.
The only reason my youngest child (out of my 4 dang kids) ever shows up on my blog is because the other kids aren't too keen on being in my blog-pictures. Ummmph. So here you have it: Me, Gracie and Matthew at the orchard.
Gracie was chomping on an apple cider doughnut and wearing makeup for her "Nerdy Fashionista" costume.
Grace has been having so much fun with her Youtube videos . If you have kids, they might...
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Self-esteem before face-lift may determine quality of life after surgery

One year ago   |   By Healio

Patient self-esteem before face-lift surgery may affect quality of life after surgery, according to recently published study results.Researchers conducted a prospective study of 59 patients undergoing rhytidectomy in a private practice from July 1 to Oct. 31, 2013. Preoperative baseline scores and scores at 6-month postoperative follow-up were measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES).
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TB rare but most common infection for patients with RA treated with Xeljanz

One year ago   |   By Healio

Tuberculosis was the most common opportunistic infection for patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with Xeljanz, however, the incidence was rare, according to recently published research.Researchers studied the data from 5,671 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) enrolled in six phase 2, six phase 3 and two open label, long-term extension studies which covered 12,664 patient-years of exposure to Xeljanz (tofacitinib, Pfizer) in 48 countries.
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Terrifying Viral Photos Prompt Important Conversation About Car Seat Safety

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

A viral Facebook post from a Florida fire department used car accident photos to share a very important message with families.
On Monday, the Wakulla County Fire Rescue shared some dramatic images from a three-vehicle crash that affected a mother and her two toddlers. The photo album was titled "Car Seats SAVE two children!"
"A one year old and three year old escaped serious injury and possibly worse because their mother took the time to assure they were secured in their approved child seats,"
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Khloé Kardashian's Thoughts on Body Confidence Are Seriously Refreshing

One year ago   |   By PopSugar

While promoting her upcoming talk show Kocktails with Khloé on FYI, Khloé Kardashian sat down with Yahoo Style's Joe Zee to chat about her body image, sibling competitiveness, and some . . . questionable weight-loss methods.
In the new episode of I Yahoo'd Myself , Khloé admits that she never saw herself as "the fat one," although she was continually regarded as such. In an extended feature for the website, she said, "Before the show, I always felt really good in my own skin but people called me 'the fat one,' so I would almost beat them to the punch. In interviews I was like, 'I know I'm...
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Malaria retreatment safe, effective against subsequent episodes

One year ago   |   By Healio

The antimalarial medication Pyramax appeared to be equally safe and efficacious during the first treatment vs. retreatment of subsequent malaria episodes, according to the results of a phase 3b/4 trial.Four prior phase 3 trials assessing Pyramax (pyronaridine/artesunate, Medicines for Malaria Venture, Shin Poong Pharmaceutical), an oral artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) used to treat Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria, showed the regimen temporarily increased patients' liver enzymes within the first 28 days of therapy, Issaka Sagara, PhD, of the Malaria Research and...
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Increased use of freestanding ASCs found for surgical care of pediatric fractures

One year ago   |   By Healio

Results of this study showed an increase in the number of pediatric patients who received operative treatment for fractures at outpatient centers during a 10-year period and revealed a significant increase in the number of these patients treated at freestanding ambulatory surgery centers compared with hospital outpatient centers. Researchers conducted an epidemiologic study of 1996 to 2006 data from the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery on 659,648 pediatric patients who underwent orthopedic surgery for at outpatient facilities. Orthopedics surgeries were identified with the...
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The Rise of Autism: What's Really Happening?

One year ago   |   By Mamavation

When a disorder shows exponential rate increases and becomes the fastest-growing developmental disability, according to the CDC , it's something worth looking into. It's happening with Autism. It's now affecting as many as 1 in 68 children in America and in the 10 year span from 2000-2010 there was a 119.4% increase in autism in the U.S.
It's a touchy subject because only 10% of Autism cases have a known causation. The other 90% are simply diagnosed with no known cause. This leads to many theories about possible causes, and not all have the adequate research to determine their validity...
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Disposable household income inversely linked to mortality after cardiac surgery

One year ago   |   By Healio

Patients with more disposable income had significantly lower mortality rates than those with less disposable income in a population-based observational cohort study.The researchers evaluated data on income, education, marital status, medical history and CV risk factors collected from 100,534 patients who received CABG, valve repair/replacement or both in Sweden between 1999 and 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67 years (27% women). All-cause mortality was assessed in this population during a mean follow-up of 7.3 years.
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SAPPHIRE Worldwide: Carotid stenting outcomes in large registry consistent with trial results

One year ago   |   By Healio

LAS VEGAS — A registry study of more than 21,000 patients undergoing carotid artery stenting showed results consistent with those from randomized controlled trials and smaller registries.Among those who had the best outcomes after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for obstructive carotid artery disease were younger patients, asymptomatic patients and patients with anatomic risk factors, D. Christopher Metzger, MD, FACC, FSCAI, said during a presentation at VIVA 15.
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What They Don't Tell You About Being a Teenager With a Chronic Illness

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

As a teenager, life can be overwhelming. Between the stress of trying to juggle extracurricular activities along with the typical teenager drama one can become exhausted. The course load, however, is where many students feel like the world is coming down on them when teachers continuously pile on several, different homework assignments every night. If you have finished high school think back to those days when you were struggling with similar tasks. No matter the time frame of when you graduated or will graduate everyone has still been through almost the exact same basic high school...
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Surveillance prior to HCC diagnosis increases survival

One year ago   |   By Healio

Researchers in The Netherlands found that surveillance before hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis improved overall survival in real-life practice, as well as decreased tumor size and increased surgical therapy time, according to study data published in the Journal of Hepatology. "Currently, several international guidelines advise regular surveillance of patients at increased HCC risk," the researchers wrote. "The goal is to detect HCC at earlier stages, enabling curative therapies with a better outcome and decreased mortality. Nonetheless, surveillance is controversial.... We investigate...
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Endovascular intervention compared to standard treatment for stroke

One year ago   |   By ScienceDaily

In a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, an endovascular intervention (such as use of a very small catheter to remove a blood clot) compared to standard medical care (administration of a clot dissolving agent) was associated with improved functional outcomes and higher rates of functional independence at 90 days, but no significant difference in symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding in the brain) or all-cause mortality, according to a study.
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Homeless Women Often Can't Afford Bras. So This Advocate Donated Over 1,000 Of Them

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

Homeless shelters often get loads of clothing donations, but nowhere near enough undergarments, which leaves women in need without bras and feeling uncomfortable, ashamed and undignified.
"There's still a stigma around periods and bras. It's taboo and sexualized," Dana Marlowe, an advocate for homeless women, told The Huffington Post. "Bras are so essential for women: for health, self-esteem, employment and more."
After losing a significant amount of weight recently, Marlowe, a principal partner at a consulting firm, was excited to purchase new clothes, but was despondent about the...
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4-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Dresses Up As Herself For School's 'Superhero Day'

One year ago   |   By Scary Mommy

If you ask most kids who their favorite superhero is, you'll probably get answers ranging from Spiderman to Wonder Woman, and everything in between. One amazing little girl had to pick out a costume for her school's superhero day, and she picked a hero not many kids would think of: she chose to go as herself.
Image via Facebook
Josie Kimberlin is four years old and in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. She was diagnosed in June of 2013 and underwent a long series of difficult treatments. Nine months after her diagnosis, her family got the amazing news that she was cancer-free...
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Homeless Women Often Can't Afford Bras. So This Advocate Donated Over 1,000 Of Them

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

Homeless shelters often get loads of clothing donations, but nowhere near enough undergarments, which leaves women in need without bras and feeling uncomfortable, ashamed and undignified.
"There's still a stigma around periods and bras. It's taboo and sexualized," Dana Marlowe, an advocate for homeless women, told The Huffington Post. "Bras are so essential for women: for health, self-esteem, employment and more."
After losing a significant amount of weight recently, Marlowe, a principal partner at a consulting firm, was excited to purchase new clothes, but was despondent about the...
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A Pilot Study of the Pediatric Oral Medications Screener (POMS)

One year ago   |   By Hospital Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE:
Oral medications are commonly used to treat acute and chronic conditions, but formal evaluation of a child's pill-swallowing ability rarely occurs. In this pilot study, the Pediatric Oral Medication Screener (POMS) was used to physically assess a child's pill swallowing ability and identify children who would benefit from a targeted intervention.
METHODS:
We identified children 3 to 17 years old admitted to a general pediatric service over a 3-month period in 2014. Patients were asked to swallow several different-sized placebo formulations. If subjects did not meet age-based...
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Outcomes After Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in Infants 90 Days Old or Younger

One year ago   |   By Hospital Pediatrics

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:
Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are an increasingly common cause of pediatric hospital visits among infants. The optimal evaluation strategy for younger infants with SSTI is unknown because there is little information about outcomes including risks of concomitant bacterial infections and treatment failure. This study was designed to determine rates of concomitant invasive bacterial infection and hospital revisits for treatment failure as well as factors associated with treatment failure in infants presenting with SSTI.
METHODS:
Retrospective study of...
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Parent and Provider Perspectives on Pediatric Readmissions: What Can We Learn About Readiness for Discharge?

One year ago   |   By Hospital Pediatrics

BACKGROUND:
Readmissions are an increasingly recognized quality metric that will likely affect payments to children's hospitals. Our aim was to inform future efforts to reduce readmissions by eliciting parent and provider perceptions of pediatric readmissions.
METHODS:
We interviewed English- and Spanish-speaking parents and inpatient providers of children with medical diagnoses who had unplanned readmissions (≤7 days). Parents were interviewed one-on-one during the readmission. Providers were interviewed in person or by phone within 1 week of the patient's second discharge...
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China's Left-Behind Children: Impact Of Parental Migration On Health, Nutrition, And Educational Outcomes (Global Health: China's Rural Children)

One year ago   |   By Health Affairs

China's rapid development and urbanization have induced large numbers of rural residents to migrate from their homes to urban areas in search of better job opportunities. Parents typically leave their children behind with a caregiver, creating a new, potentially vulnerable subpopulation of left-behind children in rural areas. A growing number of policies and nongovernmental organization efforts target these children. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether left-behind children are really the most vulnerable and in need of special programs. Pulling data from a...
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Reducing Food Loss And Waste While Improving The Public's Health (Food & Health: An Overview)

One year ago   |   By Health Affairs

An estimated 30 percent of the global food supply is lost or wasted, as is about 40 percent of the US food supply. There are valuable synergies between efforts to reduce food loss and waste and those promoting public health. To demonstrate the potential impact of building upon these synergies, we present an analysis of policies and interventions addressing food loss and waste, food security, food safety, and nutrition. We characterize as opportunities the policies and interventions that promote synergistic relationships between goals in the fields of food loss and waste and of public...
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Is the USDA Silencing Scientists?

One year ago   |   By The Atlantic

Larry Downing / Reuters Late last year, Jonathan Lundgren, a South Dakota-based entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, submitted an article to the scientific journal Naturwissenschaften . It described how clothianidin—one of a controversial class of pesticides called neonicotinoids—harmed monarch butterflies. The paper was accepted. Then, in February, a supervisor confronted Lundgren. She informed him that the paper shouldn't have been submitted without official approval. It was sensitive. Not long after, the National Academy of Sciences scheduled Lundgren to give a...
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Why Can't a Pregnant Woman Enjoy a Glass of Wine?

One year ago   |   By The Atlantic

SpeedKingz / Shutterstock I've long described pregnancy as a lengthy list of things you can't do (or eat or drink). Of course, growing and nurturing a human being is a miraculous process, but let's be honest: It's also a buzz kill. From the moment any woman finds out she's pregnant, she becomes bombarded with "no." No sushi, no hot tubs, no jumping on trampolines, no caffeine, no deli meats, and above all, no alcohol. None. Not a single drop. More From Quartz Scientists Rarely Criticize Each Other's Work. But Maybe That's Okay Is the Decline In U.S. Private Schools Making Public Schools...
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Growing up with a dog 'reduces childhood asthma risk'

One year ago   |   By NHS

"Children who grow up with a pet dog in the family home have a lower risk of developing asthma," The Times reports. A large Swedish study found an association between pet ownership and reduced risk of asthma . Living on a farm was also found to reduce this risk. The study found exposure to dogs reduced the risk of both preschool (by 10%) and school-age children having asthma by 13%. And living on a farm as a child - not just visiting one - also appeared to reduce asthma risk by an estimated 31% for preschool children and 52% for school-age children. Some commentators have argued these...
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Low-FODMAP formula improves diarrhea and nutritional status in hospitalized patients receiving enteral nutrition: a randomized, multicenter, double-blind clinical trial

One year ago   |   By Nutrition Journal

Background:
Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) are poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates that play an important role in inducing functional gut symptoms. A low-FODMAP diet improves abdominal symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. However, there were no study for the effect of FODMAP content on gastrointestinal intolerance and nutritional status in patients receiving enteral nutrition (EN).
Methods:
In this randomized, multicenter, double-blind, 14-day clinical trial, eligible hospitalized...
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Lack Of Sleep (Or Too Much Of It) Raises Diabetes Risk For Older Women

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

Middle-aged and older women who regularly get less than six hours sleep a night are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to new research just published in Diabetologia , the journal of the European Assn. for the Study of Diabetes. But the news gets worse: Those who do manage to add two hours a night to their sleep also increase their risk of developing diabetes.
So to recap: With damned if you do, damned if you don't results, the connection between sleep patterns and the risk of developing adult diabetes has been reinforced by this study of almost 60,000 women aged 55...
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Daily anti-androgen therapy improves survival for patients with recurrent prostate cancer

One year ago   |   By Healio

The addition of 2 years of daily anti-androgen therapy with bicalutamide to salvage radiation therapy significantly prolonged long-term OS without increasing toxicity among men with prostate cancer whose diseased recurred after radical prostatectomy, according to results of a double blind phase 3 trial presented at the ASTRO annual meeting.Most men who have a recurrence following the surgical removal of their prostate are treated with salvage radiation therapy to the surgical site. Because androgens stimulate prostate cancer cell growth, William U. Shipley, MD, FACR, FASTRO, the Andres...
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Significant increase in prescription drug use found among US adults

One year ago   |   By Healio

Prescription drug use, particularly use of antihypertensives, antihyperlipidemics, and antidepressants, has increased substantially since 1999 among adults, according to recently published data in JAMA. "In this nationally representative survey, significant increases in overall prescription drug use and polypharmacy were observed. These increases persisted after accounting for changes in the age distribution of the population. The prevalence of prescription drug use increased in the majority of, but not all, drug classes," Elizabeth D. Kantor, PhD, MPH, department of epidemiology and...
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Patient global assessment may accurately reflect low disease activity in patients with PsA

One year ago   |   By Healio

Patient global assessment accurately measured low disease activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis undergoing treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents, according to the results of a recently published study. A group of 124 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) was assessed at baseline before initiation of treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents (anti-TNF-) and at every 4 months for 1 year between May 1, 2012 and April 30, 2015 at the Academic Rheumatology Unit in Campobasso, Italy. In the waiting room prior to clinical evaluation, a nurse administered...
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Voluma Frequently Asked Questions

One year ago   |   By Facial Aesthetic Surgery

Facial Aesthetic Surgery in Atlanta offers the latest product in Facial Fillers - Juvederm Voluma. To help patients make an educated decision on if this filler is right for them Dr. Sinha created these general Voluma FAQs.
Voluma FAQs
What is Juvederm Voluma?
A: Voluma is the first and only filler FDA-approved to instantly add volume to the cheek area. It gives you a subtle lift, helping to restore contour and a more youthful profile.
What is Juvederm Voluma XC indicated for?
A: To restore volume loss in the facial areas such as the cheeks, temples and jawline
What makes Juvederm...
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Dr. William E. Silver Joins Atlanta Institute for Facial Aesthetic Surgery

One year ago   |   By Facial Aesthetic Surgery

Noted facial plastic surgeon, William E. Silver, MD, FACS, joins Dr. Pradeep Sinha, and will be seeing his current and new patients at this location. Triple board certified facial plastic surgeon, Dr. William Silver founded and practiced at Premier Image Cosmetic & Laser Surgery until November, 2014. He is excited to provide the same quality of care in a personalized setting at his new location, while focusing his entire energy on his patients. Dr. Silver is known for the individualized attention that he gives to each patient, while creating beautiful and natural results.
Dr. William...
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Summer Skin Alert: Take Measures Now to Prevent Sun Damage Later

One year ago   |   By Facial Aesthetic Surgery

With the warm weather finally here, you're probably going to be spending a lot more time outdoors—at the beach, by the pool, playing sports, having backyard BBQs, going to picnics at the park, and even doing yard work and gardening. Your skin will be getting a lot of exposure to the sun.
You probably know it's important to protect your skin from sun damage. Besides causing skin cancer, the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays can break down the skin's collagen and elastin, aging you before your time. In fact, most characteristics associated with aging, such as wrinkles, deep skin furrows, mottled...
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Dr. Silver Sculpts the Future of Facial Plastic Surgery at the AAFPRS 2015 Fall Meeting

One year ago   |   By Facial Aesthetic Surgery

The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) is the largest specialty association for facial plastic surgery, representing over 2,700 surgeons internationally. The AAFPRS hosts national meetings each year to bring together highly talented facial plastic surgeons from around the world to share their expertise and experiences. Sessions and courses are given to dispense information regarding pertinent clinical topics, ranging from the latest scientific research to ethical concerns. This year, the AAFPRS 2015 Fall Meeting is being held in Dallas, Texas from...
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Improvements in U.S. diet lower premature deaths

One year ago   |   By Harvard

A new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , published November 2, showed that while recent improvements in the U.S. diet have helped reduce disease and premature death, the overall American diet is still poor.
Researchers analyzed how changes in dietary quality from 1999 to 2012 impacted disease and premature death, and found that during that time span healthier eating habits cumulatively prevented 1.1 million premature deaths and resulted in 12.6 percent fewer type 2 diabetes cases, 8.6 percent fewer cardiovascular disease cases, and 1.3 percent fewer cancer cases...
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Gun Violence, Mental illness and Money

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

On this beautiful fall day in northeast Ohio, I wish I were writing something about pumpkins and the amazing colors on the trees, but as a psychologist I have been asked to share my thoughts about the ongoing debate over mental illness and gun control.
I would venture to guess that all of you have strong thoughts about mental health and perhaps even stronger thoughts and opinions about gun control. But when the two topics are presented together, it is nearly impossible to find individuals who feel neutral about the subject - it evokes our emotional brain and logic seems to sit silent. It...
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Confidentiality Is Key: To Reduce Teen Pregnancy, the U.S. Must Ban Parental Notification Laws for Contraception

One year ago   |   By The Huffington Post

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reported last week that the state's teen pregnancy rate was cut in half from 2009 to 2014 thanks to a program called the Colorado Family Planning Initiative. The results of this program - which gives teens and young women unrestricted access to effective birth control - are unequivocal. There have already been calls to increase funding for the program and expand it to other states. But many of the places that need it most have state laws that make providing confidential contraception to teens illegal.
As a women's health physician...
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Abdominal dermal-fat grafts for buttock augmentation

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

As U.S. demand for augmentation gluteoplasty continues to grow, plastic surgeons are exploring novel techniques for meeting that demand.
With this in mind, three plastic surgeons—Gary Brownstein, M.D., Berlin, N.J., and Claude Muresan, M.D., and Samir Shureih, M.D., both of Baltimore—conducted a study to validate one of those techniques: The abdominal dermal-fat graft augmentation gluteoplasty.
The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of lower abdominal dermal-fat graft augmentation gluteoplasties. They focused on nine female patients, with a mean age of 46, who had undergone...
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Skin adhesive rivals sutures in wound-closing study

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

Recently released results of a European study suggest that a new topical skin adhesive is as effective as intradermal sutures in wound closures.
A team of researchers from Belgium, Sweden, Germany and the UK conducted an investigation to determine the equivalence of the PRINEO™ Skin Closure System to intradermal sutures used in closing wounds.
According to the study abstract, the investigation focused on 79 patients who underwent elective surgery for bilateral breast procedures. Each breast incision had been randomized to wound closure with either the PRINEO™ topical adhesive or...
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Dynamic movement 4D video: Before and after gynecomastia treatment

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

Jason Emer, M.D., a board certified and fellowship-trained general, cosmetic and procedural dermatologist in Beverly Hills, Calif., suggests that using dynamic movement (4D) photography and/or video is extremely beneficial for communicating with his patients who undergo high-definition body contouring (e.g., abdominal sculpting, gynecomastia surgery, arm defining) treatments where small improvements can provide sizable changes in contour and shadowing. "It is also beneficial in those patients with lipedema who require substantial volume reduction and see a dramatic improvement in...
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Novel extended-release local analgesic improves post-facial rejuvenation outcomes

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons , facelifts remain one of the top five cosmetic surgery procedures performed in 2013, likely owed to the major advances in surgical techniques that speed up recovery time and enhance a patient's overall experience. From microsurgery to mini-lifts, the idea of post-op "downtime" may soon be a thing of the past, if postsurgical pain management protocols can catch up to the significant strides we've made on the technical front. Especially in the case of elective surgeries, adequate pain management is vital to a patient's positive...
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Study considers transaxillary technique for high-risk patients

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

New research suggests that the transaxillary incision technique for breast implant exchange procedures in high-risk patients is a safe, effective, perhaps preferable option to the standard anterior approach.
Noting that attenuated soft tissue caused by radiation, anatomy or surgery can be problematic in the anterior approach, a team of plastic surgeons from Massachusetts General Hospital undertook an evaluation of the transaxillary technique. The study involved analyzing the results of the transaxillary approach for implant exchange on 16 patients — average age, just under 50 — who had...
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PRP performs well in adjunctive role with laser resurfacing

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

Thanks to its ability to improve wound healing, hemostasis and graft survival, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is used for many surgical applications. Now another application — ablative fractional photothermolysis — can be added to the list.
Plastic surgeons Haena Kim, M.D., of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and Julio Gallo, M.D., Miami Institute for Age Management and Intervention, conducted a prospective blinded study to determine whether PRP would be effective in reducing both healing time and duration of adverse effects when used as an adjunctive treatment with...
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Study examines venous risks with post-abdominoplasty compression garments

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

A common practice following one of the most popular plastic surgery procedures was recently given a closer look at the Federal University of Brazil. The study was undertaken to determine whether the use of compression garments after abdominoplasty promotes changes at the femoral vein, such as venous stasis, a risk factor for blood clots.
The study , published in the January issue of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery , evaluated the use of both compressive garments and Velcro binders versus neither in female patients with no prior abdominal surgery. All patients were also evaluated in both...
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Study: Tarsal sling for post-blepharoplasty lower eyelid malposition

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

Blepharoplasty may be a popular procedure for facial rejuvenation, but it is not without drawbacks, including the risk of eyelid displacement that comes with lower transcutaneous blepharoplasty. A team of researchers in Italy examined how effective the tarsal sling technique is for reducing the risk of lower eyelid margin malposition in a study published in the January issue of Aesthetic Surgery Journal .
The study consisted of a retrospective analysis of 40 blepharoplasty patients, half of whom also received tarsal sling support. Eyelid margins were evaluated on the basis of quantitative...
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Early intervention: fractional-laser scar treatment

One year ago   |   By Modern Medicine

New research suggests that single treatment of a surgical scar with an ablative CO2 fractional laser is not only safe and efficacious, but preferred by patients.
Past studies have shown that early treatment of post-surgical scars with pulsed dye and non-ablative fractional lasers improves scar appearance, but there have been few studies involving ablative fractional lasers similarly used.

Study Methods

More Laser Research
PRP and laser resurfacing

Improving keloid treatment with cryotherapy

The new research involved 20 subjects between the ages of 20 and 90 who had facial...
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If You Have Big Boobs And Can't Find A Damn Suit, This Swimwear Line Is Your...

Cute suits for cup sizes D and up? Yes, please If you have large breasts and prefer to wear two-piece bathing suits, you know the struggle. Very few are made to support women... Read more ...

Fathers' Participation In Child Care Prevents Childhood Obesity

By encouraging fathers to increase their involvement in child caregiving, reduces obesity risk among young children, aging 2 to 4 years. Read more ...

9 Unique Travel Destinations That Focus on Fitness and Fun

Summer may be the season when you want to be in the best shape ever , but that doesn't mean you need to spend all of your warm-weather time inside a stuffy gym, either. Luckily... Read more ...

Acupuncture found to be a safe and effective alternative to dangerous...

A recent study published in MJA.com.au revealed that acupuncture may serve as a safe and effective alternative to pain-relieving drugs for patients arriving at a hospital's... Read more ...

U.S. stops all imports of Brazilian beef for food safety concerns

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has suspended all imports of fresh beef from Brazil because of recurring food safety problems discovered since March, when the agency began... Read more ...

E-Cigarettes and Lung Health: Should You Be Concerned?

Visit us at Mamavation.com for more updates, healthy tips and challenges. With so many people quitting smoking and then switching to e-cigarettes, the question about their... Read more ...

Senate releases healthcare bill, and critics mobilize against it

With healthcare cuts to beneficiaries and tax cuts for well-off families, an uncertain future lies ahead for the Senate version of a new healthcare bill to replace Obamacare. Read more ...

Ohio State University study says very thin female runners at greater risk...

A study found that female runners with a body mass index, or BMI, of 19 or below were more likely to develop stress fractures, and took longer to heal, said Dr. Tim Miller... Read more ...

Fight Fast Boxing HIIT Workout

Workout equipment: Workout type: 12 minute Timer setting: 18 x :10 x :30 1. Punching burpees 2. Candlestick jump ups 3. Four punch combo 4. High knees w/ jump rope 5... Read more ...

Get Motivated Jump Rope HIIT Workout

Workout equipment: Workout type: 12 minute Timer setting: 18 x :10 x :30 1. Double unders OR Single unders 2. Snowboarder jumps 3. Mountain climber burpees 4. High knees w... Read more ...